Interesting articles – Chinese veg, native dye plants, plum tours, food supply, the pleasures of scything

As part of an effort to make myself read and properly digest more articles I’m going to experiment with fairly regular digests of interesting “esculent” and “et cetera” themed articles I’ve enjoyed. Here’s my first batch…

Vietnamese mustard - not a Chinese vegetable (perhaps) and not growing in Kent, but you get the idea

Vietnamese mustard – not a Chinese vegetable (perhaps) and not growing in Kent, but you get the idea

UK-grown exotic Chinese vegetables – FT.com

Who’d have thunk Kent is home to 40 acres of Oriental vegetables? I’ve never heard of this before. I’m impressed with the farmer’s ploy of offering unusual edibles to encourage restaurants and shops to source the “common” pak choi from him as well. That almost makes up for the dubious concept of releasing fish.

http://www.jennydean.co.uk/index.php/the-dye-garden-is-developing/

“Wild Colour” expert Jenny Dean is growing native dye plants. This post is from a couple of weeks ago, but I came across it because I was looking up saw-wort. And I was looking up saw-wort because I wondered if I’d ever mistaken it for knapweed. The answer is probably not…but having seen this post I’m going to be looking out for it more closely in future as it sounds like something I’d like to have a go at growing and using one day.

http://www.sourcewire.com/news/78962/roll-up-roll-up-for-the-plumptious-pershore-plum-tours

If I were nearer this sounds like a reasonably priced day learning, looking at and sampling all things plum, although I’m disappointed the guides are only going for a colour theme and not full-on spherical plum outfits. Slight lack of commitment there I feel but no doubt something they’ll rectify for next year, preferably with pictures. The orchard visit sounds particularly attractive and a laudable project, the Vale Landscape Heritage Trust.

http://www.transitionnetwork.org/blogs/rob-hopkins/2013-07/joanna-blythman-power-lots-and-lots-little-projects

There are more benefits to sourcing locally, rather than globally, than the potential (but not certainty) of reducing food miles. An in-depth interview with author Joanna Blythman.

http://www.hartley-botanic.co.uk/featured-blogs/john-walker/the-kinder-cut

I had rather more fun than I should let on coming up with silly alternative headlines for this article. However, aside from the potential for punnery, John Walker presents an enticing image of living without the noise, pollution, costs and other disadvantages of strimmers and mowers.

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2 thoughts on “Interesting articles – Chinese veg, native dye plants, plum tours, food supply, the pleasures of scything

  1. Esculent Etc says:

    It’s a good blog and her book Wild Colour (though sadly I think not in print in the UK at the moment – I’m wondering whether to buy the US version) is disturbingly idea-provoking. I’m put off most dyeing by the “need” for scary sounding mordants. It’s definitely something I want to find time for one day!

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